Basin Electric Team Tests Microwave Equipment

Rules of the Game: Low Latency Microwave in a Multi-Regulatory Environment

[潛伏Latency] Charcoal, watercolor, fire on paper, 2011. Photo credit: RedPapaya (栩) / Foter / CC BY-NC-ND

[潛伏Latency] Charcoal, watercolor, fire on paper, 2011. Photo credit: RedPapaya (栩) / Foter / CC BY-NC-ND

Over the course of the last 18 months, a new application has grown by leaps and bounds for microwave networks: low latency. Low-latency microwave networks find most of their applicability in financial transactions, such as for executing trading instructions between major stock exchanges and trading houses in other cities.

Typically, low-latency microwave is used to “replace” traditional-fiber based networks linking financial centers. The business driver for microwave-instead-of-fiber in low latency is the time it takes to transmit trading instructions. With microwave, latency is reduced by a few milliseconds as compared to fiber. Nevertheless, those few milliseconds can translate into a trading edge over rival investors, which means big bucks. Low latency investors will pay a premium for this edge resulting in increased revenue for low-latency microwave network operators.

However, as with most financial functions, low latency is subject to a set of stringent regulations. The scenario is doubly difficult when low-latency microwave networks transmit across international boundaries. This compares to linking financial centers within a single country, which is relatively straightforward from a regulatory perspective because there is only one set of rules. The fact is when connecting financial centers in different nations and the operator’s network has to traverse other countries’ borders, the process becomes orders of magnitude more complex. Download the complete article for a fuller examination of some of these issues and why there should be widespread support for greater international harmonization of microwave regulation.

Ian Marshall
Regulatory Manager
Aviat Networks

A (Personal) Milestone in Microwave Networking

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Figure 1: Aviat Networks’ senior network engineer Ivan Zambrano shares his first microwave radio path plan on the occasion of his 28th anniversary with the company.

Recently, Aviat Networks was privileged to mark a milestone for one of its longest tenured and most distinguished employees, Ivan Zambrano. For 28 years, Ivan has dedicated his professional life to providing education and expert analysis to the microwave backhaul community, on the behalf of Aviat Networks and its corporate predecessors. As a senior engineer, Ivan teaches network transmission courses and other topics around the world on a regular basis.

However, Ivan got his start in the field. In fact, he still has the very first microwave radio path plan he ever created for a television station in Louisiana (Figure 1).

Together with the legendary Dick Laine (Figure 2), the two veteran microwave communications professionals have a combined 97 years of experience in the field. Unbelievably, Ivan actually has seniority over Dick (in the company at least). Dick has only been with us for a mere 26 years!

Between-Aviat-Networks-Dick-Laine-left-and-Ivan-Zambrano-right-the-two-microwave-radio-path-planners-have-97-years-experience-13Sep13

Figure 2: Dick Laine (left) and Ivan Zambrano have a combined 97 years of microwave experience.

To help celebrate the occasion, Aviat Networks CEO, president and board member Michael Pangia took some time to personally congratulate Ivan (Figure 3). So here’s to you Ivan! We’re all looking forward to at least another 28 years!

Aviat-Networks-CEO-president-and-board-member-Michael-Pangia-personally-contragulated-Ivan-Zambrano-on-his-28-years-with-Aviat

Figure 3: Aviat CEO Michael Pangia and Ivan.

If you’d be interested in having Ivan or Dick lend a hand (or bend an ear) on your microwave project, let us know by dropping a note below. Give us an idea about the type of training or consultation you need and any other pertinent details about the project.

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Top Trends in Backhaul Summer 2013

Ryan-Bruton-Aviat-Networks-senior-international-marketing-manager-sees-big-trends-against-fiber-and-for-microwave-in-backhaul-in-summer-2013

Ryan Bruton: Aviat Networks senior international marketing manager.

As the summer in the Northern Hemisphere quickly draws to a close, we can look back to the beginning of the season to see what was on the mind of the backhaul market. Our international marketing manager, Ryan Bruton, gave an interview to CommsMEA covering the trends in backhaul for this time period.

In microwave backhaul, for the African market, radio links are averaging around 40 kilometers in length, says Bruton. This is due in part to climatological conditions, but other factors could also be involved, he says. However, in the Middle East, the typical microwave backhaul links are above this average—also partially due to the atmosphere and geography.

Another big trend Bruton sees this summer in backhaul includes the barriers to fiber being used in the Middle East and Africa markets. Accordingly, fiber is very difficult to trench over kilometers and kilometers of open desert. The terrain is inhospitable and very tough on fiber due to high heat and arid conditions. Not to mention bringing in the equipment necessary to install long fiber routes can be a very large obstacle if the paths lay some distance away from existing roads and other infrastructure. Going through the lush flora of Africa, such as in Nigeria, trenching fiber presents a different yet also nearly insurmountable set of barriers, with massive stands of sometimes-centuries-old trees. And clearcutting tropical rainforest to make way for a fiber backhaul route is neither cheap nor “green.”

Microwave is both the more cost-effective and greener alternative compared to fiber-optic technology for wireless backhaul. Currently achieving about 50 percent of the total market share for backhaul worldwide, microwave certainly is a driver for mobile and other wireless network operators.

Then there is always the potential for fiber to fall victim to so-called “backhoe fade,” a euphemism for the accidental cutting of fiber lines by misguided digging operations. But there is always the potential that fiber cuts are not accidental. In any event, fiber is vulnerable to cuts over the entire course of a route—from Point A to Point B. Microwave sites are isolated to a single spot where they may be assailable. At least operators have the option of “hardening” their microwave sites for maximum uptime, whereas, again, this would be too cost prohibitive in the case of fiber over an entire route.