Top Trends in Backhaul Summer 2013

Ryan-Bruton-Aviat-Networks-senior-international-marketing-manager-sees-big-trends-against-fiber-and-for-microwave-in-backhaul-in-summer-2013

Ryan Bruton: Aviat Networks senior international marketing manager.

As the summer in the Northern Hemisphere quickly draws to a close, we can look back to the beginning of the season to see what was on the mind of the backhaul market. Our international marketing manager, Ryan Bruton, gave an interview to CommsMEA covering the trends in backhaul for this time period.

In microwave backhaul, for the African market, radio links are averaging around 40 kilometers in length, says Bruton. This is due in part to climatological conditions, but other factors could also be involved, he says. However, in the Middle East, the typical microwave backhaul links are above this average—also partially due to the atmosphere and geography.

Another big trend Bruton sees this summer in backhaul includes the barriers to fiber being used in the Middle East and Africa markets. Accordingly, fiber is very difficult to trench over kilometers and kilometers of open desert. The terrain is inhospitable and very tough on fiber due to high heat and arid conditions. Not to mention bringing in the equipment necessary to install long fiber routes can be a very large obstacle if the paths lay some distance away from existing roads and other infrastructure. Going through the lush flora of Africa, such as in Nigeria, trenching fiber presents a different yet also nearly insurmountable set of barriers, with massive stands of sometimes-centuries-old trees. And clearcutting tropical rainforest to make way for a fiber backhaul route is neither cheap nor “green.”

Microwave is both the more cost-effective and greener alternative compared to fiber-optic technology for wireless backhaul. Currently achieving about 50 percent of the total market share for backhaul worldwide, microwave certainly is a driver for mobile and other wireless network operators.

Then there is always the potential for fiber to fall victim to so-called “backhoe fade,” a euphemism for the accidental cutting of fiber lines by misguided digging operations. But there is always the potential that fiber cuts are not accidental. In any event, fiber is vulnerable to cuts over the entire course of a route—from Point A to Point B. Microwave sites are isolated to a single spot where they may be assailable. At least operators have the option of “hardening” their microwave sites for maximum uptime, whereas, again, this would be too cost prohibitive in the case of fiber over an entire route.


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